> home | News

NEWS

November 14-20, 2016 World Antibiotic Awareness Week
BIRDY, a project that looks at the antibiotic resistanceAntibiotic resistance
Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing steadily worldwide in hospitals as well as in the community. These infections often have more severe outcomes than those caused by so called "sensitive" bacteria. As a consequence, they also require more expensive second-line treatments as well as a more careful and costly follow-up care for patients.
in young children






Discover how the BIRDY project is implemented in different countries:

Senegal:


BIRDY – Fight against antibiotic resistanceAntibiotic resistance
Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing steadily worldwide in hospitals as well as in the community. These infections often have more severe outcomes than those caused by so called "sensitive" bacteria. As a consequence, they also require more expensive second-line treatments as well as a more careful and costly follow-up care for patients.
in Senegal


Cambodia:


Madagascar:





March, 2016


The BIRDY Program highlighted on the website of the French Embassy in Cambodia!


This article describes (in French) the visit of Mrs. Pascale TURQUET (Secretary of cooperation) to a BIRDY site in Steung Meanchey, under the guidance of the local BIRDY coordination team.





March, 2016


Discover more about the BIRDY Program in Senegal! Read the interview (in English or French) of the local coordinator, Dr Awa Ndir talking about the challenges of running the program.



and watch a podcast (soundtrack in French) presenting the Senegalese site and the health center involved in the program!




February 6th, 2016


The Lancet logo


Researchers from the Birdy study group published a correspondence in The Lancet calling for increased research and public health efforts in addressing neonatal bacterial infections and antibiotic resistanceAntibiotic resistance
Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing steadily worldwide in hospitals as well as in the community. These infections often have more severe outcomes than those caused by so called "sensitive" bacteria. As a consequence, they also require more expensive second-line treatments as well as a more careful and costly follow-up care for patients.
in low-income countriesLow-income countries
The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countriesDeveloping country
This term is generally used to describe a nation with a low level of material well-being. Since no single definition of the term developing country is recognized internationally, the levels of development may vary widely within so-called developing countries. Some developing countries have high average standards of living.

The World Bank classifies all low- and middle-income countries as developing but notes, "The use of the term is convenient; it is not intended to imply that all economies in the group are experiencing similar development or that other economies have reached a preferred or final stage of development. Classification by income does not necessarily reflect development status".
around the world. It is not a bank in the common sense. It is made up of two unique development institutions owned by 187 member countries: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA). Each institution plays a different but collaborative role in advancing the vision of inclusive and sustainable globalization. The IBRD aims to reduce poverty in middle-income and creditworthy poorer countries, while the IDA focuses on the world's poorest countries.

For operational and analytical purposes, the World Bank's main criterion for classifying economies is gross national income (GNI) per capita. Based on its annual GNI per capita, every economy is classified as low-income, middle income (lower and upper middle income) or high income.
. Abstract.




January 26th, 2016

The recruitment of BIRDY babies has been very active in 2015, here is an update on the number of babies in our three sites across the globe on 31/12/2015:

Madagascar      


1788 inclusions since the beginning of the project in 2012! Still 623 babies being followed up in Antananarivo and 424 in the rural site of Moramanga.


Senegal


251 babies are currently part of the BIRDY study


Cambodia


Already 404 babies have been enrolled in the project!

233 in Kampong Speu (rural zone) and 171 in Steung Meanchey (urban area)





Thank you to all the families who trust the program and support its development.




January 4th, 2016


The BIRDY team wishes all babies and families involved in the program, as well as all partners across the world, a wonderful and healthy new year!


Renaming the program

Last year, following the tragic events in Paris against the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo on January 7th 2015 and the resulting resonance that the name ‘CHARLI’ could have in France and in the countries of predominantly Muslim faiths (such as Senegal), it was decided to rename the program as BIRDY for "Bacterial Infections and Antibiotic Resistance Diseases Among Young Children in Low Income Countries". Additionally, to ensure a better appropriation by the population, the program has also been given a local name in the dominant dialect in each participating countries:



 

 

In Madagascar, it became the FAFAH program (FAnarahamaso ny FAHasalaman'ny ankizy), which means ‘Monitoring children's health’.


©Bruno Deméocq / Fondation Total

In Senegal, NAFY for NAtt Febaruu tout tank Yii in Wolof language, meaning ‘Assessing the diseases in small children’.

 

 


 

And in Cambodia, Sokhapiep Koma Laoh, which could be translated by ‘Healthy Child’, in Khmer language.

 




September 2015 Recruitment in the rural area of Senegal


The region of Fatick (in the district of Sokone; 17 000 inhabitants – 200 km from Dakar) has been selected as the rural site in Senegal and recruitment of babies has started! The local Birdy Team has been assembled and trained during the summer to be fully operational for this new site.

 


                                       ©Bruno Deméocq / Fondation Total

 




June 2015 A new member in the Cambodian Birdy Team



Dr Agathe de Lauzanne joined the coordination team in Cambodia.

She is a pediatrician and epidemiologist. A warm welcome to her!

 





March 17th, 2015

Christian Bréchot, directeur général de  l'Institut Pasteur, Cyril Schiever, président du conseil  d'administration de MSDAVENIR et Aurélien Mollard, secrétaire général de  l'ANRS, à la Maison de l'Amérique latine, le 17 mars 2015.

 Thanks to the support of MSD AVENIR the complete phase of the study in Cambodia can be launched in April 2015 in Cambodia! The agreement was signed between the Institut Pasteur and the foundation on March 17th 2015 and will run until the end of 2017.




March 30-31st, 2015


The BIRDY project will hold the first meeting of its scientific advisory board followed by a workshop on antibiotic resistanceAntibiotic resistance
Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing steadily worldwide in hospitals as well as in the community. These infections often have more severe outcomes than those caused by so called "sensitive" bacteria. As a consequence, they also require more expensive second-line treatments as well as a more careful and costly follow-up care for patients.
in low-income countriesLow-income countries
The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countriesDeveloping country
This term is generally used to describe a nation with a low level of material well-being. Since no single definition of the term developing country is recognized internationally, the levels of development may vary widely within so-called developing countries. Some developing countries have high average standards of living.

The World Bank classifies all low- and middle-income countries as developing but notes, "The use of the term is convenient; it is not intended to imply that all economies in the group are experiencing similar development or that other economies have reached a preferred or final stage of development. Classification by income does not necessarily reflect development status".
around the world. It is not a bank in the common sense. It is made up of two unique development institutions owned by 187 member countries: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA). Each institution plays a different but collaborative role in advancing the vision of inclusive and sustainable globalization. The IBRD aims to reduce poverty in middle-income and creditworthy poorer countries, while the IDA focuses on the world's poorest countries.

For operational and analytical purposes, the World Bank's main criterion for classifying economies is gross national income (GNI) per capita. Based on its annual GNI per capita, every economy is classified as low-income, middle income (lower and upper middle income) or high income.
March 30th and 31st, 2015 at the Institut Pasteur in Paris.  The workshop will include presentations by scientific advisory board members as well as a number of international experts in the field of antibiotic resistanceAntibiotic resistance
Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing steadily worldwide in hospitals as well as in the community. These infections often have more severe outcomes than those caused by so called "sensitive" bacteria. As a consequence, they also require more expensive second-line treatments as well as a more careful and costly follow-up care for patients.




November 1st, 2014


With support from the Monegasque Department of International Cooperation, out study site in Madagascar has passed from the initial pilot phase to the full project phase including an 18 month follow-up of children included in the cohort.




October 28th, 2014


We are happy to announce the first BIRDY baby included in the cohort from our study center in Senegal.











September 9th, 2014


A renewal of the funding for the BIRDY project by the Monegasque Department of International Cooperation was signed to support the project in Madagascar. This renewal highlights the continued confidence in the objectives and progress of the project. 




September 1st, 2014

We are happy to announce the first BIRDY baby included in the cohort from our study center in Cambodia. 




August 21st, 2014

Enrollment for the BIRDY project in Cambodia is now open.  Five mothers have already been recruited making the BIRDY cohort truly international.  The first BIRDY babies are expected as soon as the beginning of September.   




April 14th - 25th, 2014


Michael Padget carried out a mission at the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar.  The purpose of this mission was to ensure data quality and data tracking.  The mission was also used to prepare the field for a community survey on antibiotic use which will be done as part of his PhD work. 





April 5th, 2014

Fanny Chereau presented the results of her study on ESBL carriage among BIRDY mothers and during 16th international Congress on Infectious Diseases (ICID)




March 1st, 2014

The BIRDY project is happy to announce the participation of two new international sites in Cambodia and Senegal.  The new sites will rely on the Institut Pasteur International Network centers in these two countries.  Both sites are currently in preparation and expect to begin recruitment starting in September, 2014. 


   




February 10th - 16th, 2014

Dr. Elisabeth Delarocque-Astagneau, Co-Principal Investigator of the BIRDY project and Dr. Elsa Kermorvant , the referent paediatricianDr Elsa Kermorvant
Pediatrician, MD, PhD. EK is neonatologist at Necker Hospital and assistant professor at Paris Descartes University. She joined the BIRDY program as a research advising pediatrician.
for the project, visited the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar and held training sessions with BIRDY pediatricians in both Antananarivo and Moramanga.  The purpose of these training sessions was to reinforce participant knowledge and acceptance of biological sample analysis.  






January 13th – 26th, 2014

Fanny Chereau carried out a mission at the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar.  The objectives of the mission were to evaluated the tracking and quality of biological samples, verify the team organization in Moramanga and investigate protocol adherence among BIRDY doctors.   She also verified the follow-up of her study on antibiotic resistant enterobacteriaceae (ESBL) colonization among BIRDY mothers.




October 7th - 18th, 2013

Michael Padget carried out a mission at the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar.  The purpose of this mission was to verify study progress and the successful implementation of changes put into place during the previous mission.  A specific focus was placed on the organization and biological sample tracking in Moramanga. 




July 1st – October 18th, 2013

Fanny Chereau completed her Master’s internship in Madagascar working with the BIRDY team.  Her work included completion of a complementary study of colonization by antibiotic resistant enterobacteriaceae (ESBL) among BIRDY mothers.  This study looked at risk factors for ESBL carriage and, based on encouraging results among the first 139 mother included, was extended until March 2014.




 
July 1st, 2013

We are proud to annonce the inclusion of the 400th BIRDY baby!




June 26th, 2013

The BIRDY project was presented for the first time before an international audience by Dr. Elisabeth Delarocque-Astagneau at the International Consortium for Prevention & Infection Control in Geneva, Switzerland.  Initial reactions to the project were all very positive.





May 26th - June 8th, 2013


Michael Padget carried out a mission at the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar.  The goal of the mission was to verify protocol adherence by health care staff working with the study as well as the successful implementation of changes made during previous missions including data management issues. 




March 1st, 2013


Recruitment for the BIRDY project continues to be strong and we recently included our 200th BIRDY baby! We are also proud to announce our first group of BIRDY program graduates as infants enrolled in September 2012 are now coming to the end of their 6 month follow-up period. A high proportion of parents have already asked about continuing in the program past 6 months indicating their enthusiasm for the BIRDY project. 




January 29th - February 8th, 2013


Dr. Bich-Tram Huynh and Michael Padget carried-out a technical mission at the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar to monitor and optimize the collection and recording of data. The visit was also the opportunity for Michael to meet study staff and familiarize himself with the local study activities.





December 10th, 2012


Marco Ravelonanosy joined the BIRDY project as a field investigator. Marco has an educational background in nursing and has worked in both reanimation and emergency departments. In addition to his training, Marco's experience in rural health centers will make him a valuable addition to the study team in Moramanga.




December 3rd - 4th, 2012


Sophie Robin, from the Monegasque Department of International Cooperation, visited the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar as well as the BIRDY study site in Moramanga. Ms. Robin was hosted by Dr. Christophe Rogier, director of the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar. In Moramanga, guided by Dr. Benoit Garin and Dr. Perlinot Henridrainy, Ms. Robin visited a health care center (Centre de santé materno-infantile in Moramanga) as well as a hospital pediatric department working with the study. She also attended a home visit with a field investigator and met the entire BIRDY team in Madagascar as well as local health workers working with the study. Sophie Robin's visit allowed her to familiarize herself with the study's research work and emphasizes the support of the principality of Monaco for the BIRDY project.




October 16th - 26th, 2012

Dr. Bich-Tram Huynh performed a follow-up mission at the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar. The aim of her visit was to ensure smooth implementation of the BIRDY project and protocol compliance by investigators and health workers involved in the study. In collaboration with the local team, unanticipated problems as well as logistic and human resource issues were identified and resolved.




September 17th, 2012 in Antananarivo and Moramanga (Madagascar)


The ChARLI Project pilot phase was officially launched in both the Antananarivo and Moramanga sites. The first week of recruitment resulted in the successful inclusion of several mothers and the first official BIRDY baby.




July 2nd, 2012 in Antananarivo (Madagascar)



The six field investigators



The two clinical research physicians


The Institut Pasteur in Madagascar is happy to welcome the two clinical research physicians and the six field investigators recruited for the implementation of the BIRDY Pilot Phase study:

  • At the Antananarivo site: Dr Raheliarivao Bodonirina Tanjona, Ranaivomanana Toky Mahefasoa, Ranaivomanana Andry Nantenaina, Rakotondratefy Miora Fanomezana, Ratasiaribe Nomenjanahary Herald Lorria and Voarinirina Tokiravakiniaina.
  • At the Moramanga site: Dr Rakotobe Miora and Volahasina Antsa Tanjona.


Most of them have already collaborated with the epidemiology unit of Institut Pasteur in Madagascar within the framework of previous large epidemiological studies. Therefore, they are fully operational, familiarized with local population, and have a good experience in field-based epidemiological studies.


Dr Perlinot Herindrainy, local epidemiological coordinator at the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar, is in charge of supervising their work.




From March 11th to 24th, 2012 in Antananarivo and Moramanga (Madagascar)


Dr Bich-Tram Huynh, field coordinator of the BIRDY project at the Institut Pasteur, visited the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar. Her visit was dedicated to the field site preparation both in Antananarivo and Moramanga, the urban and rural sites selected for the pilot phase study implementation. Meetings and discussions with partners at the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar and local health workers involved in the project were held to properly establish all the necessary logistics, study materials, and procedures in each field study site.




January 2nd, 2011 in Paris (France)

Bich-Tram Huynh (epidemiologist PhD, MD), and Michael Padget, (epidemiologist MPH), joined the Coordinating Group of the BIRDY project at the Institut Pasteur. Their main duties will be to ensure the global field coordination of the project pilot-phase.




From November 29th to December 2nd, 2011 in Antananarivo (Madagascar)








Dr Elisabeth Delarocque-Astagneau, Co-Principal Investigator of the BIRDY project at the Institut Pasteur, and the referent paediatricianDr Elsa Kermorvant
Pediatrician, MD, PhD. EK is neonatologist at Necker Hospital and assistant professor at Paris Descartes University. She joined the BIRDY program as a research advising pediatrician.
for the project, Dr Elsa Kermorvant (Necker Hospital), visited the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar. The objective was to progress in finalising the study protocol for the pilot-phase and to focus specifically on the health care of the participating children. To do so, they met the main paediatricians involved in the project in order to clarify the diagnostic approach and treatment of child bacterial infections and to determine the best local standard of care. They also visited, in Antananarivo, the paediatric units in the hospitals involved in the BIRDY project.



From July 11th to 13th, 2011 in Antananarivo and Moramanga (Madagascar)


Dr Didier Guillemot, Principal Investigator of the BIRDY project, visited the Institut Pasteur in Madagascar, in order to meet the future local stakeholders and discuss the difficulties to be faced when implementing the project. The pilot-phase sites were identified with epidemiologists and microbiologists from the Pasteur Institute of Madagascar, according to their knowledge, experience, and the available demographic data. A rural site 150 km from Antananarivo (within the town of Moramanga) and an urban site (within the town of Antananarivo) were selected.




December 21st, 2010 in Monaco Principality


In December 2010, the Principality of Monaco and the Institut Pasteur signed a partnership agreement to combat infant antibiotic resistant infections in the lower-income countries.


Links:
http://www.cooperation-monaco.gouv.mc/315Coop/wwwnew.nsf/ c3241c4782f528bdc1256d52004f970b/ 1ff305f9d5838194c12578010033732c! OpenDocument

http://www.pasteur.fr/ip/easysite/pasteur/fr/ presse/communiques-de-presse/2010/partenariat-entre-la-principaute-de-monaco-et-l-institut-pasteur



November 3rd, 2010 in Paris (France)


All the potential partner organisations interested in working with the BIRDY project came to Paris for a one-day working meeting. Participants represented mainly African countries, with the participation of various regional members of the Institut Pasteur International Network. Caribbean and Cambodian organisations were also represented. The objective of this meeting were to: (i) meet other project members, (ii) introduce the BIRDY project concept and discuss its feasibility, (iii) share field experiences and local challenges, (iv) think together about the implementation of operational monitoring of a cohort of several thousand live births at each partner site and (v) design a preliminary global methodological approach for the BIRDY project.