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PASTEUR CENTER IN CAMEROON

The Pasteur Center in Cameroon (CPC), founded in 1959, is a national public health and research center located in Yaounde. In 1985 an annex of this center was created in Garoua in order to better serve this region.

The main activities of the CPC focus on infectious diseases and include 4 principal missions:

  • Service - activities carried-out for the benefit of the local population include biomedical analysis, vaccinations, and toxicological analysis among others.

  • Public Health - including epidemiological surveillance, quality controls, etc.

  • Research - studies related to the national and regional public health priorities such as: HIV, Hepatitis, Poliomyelitis, Enterovirus, Flu, Tuberculosis, Buruli Ulcer, resistance to anti-infectious agents, environmental bacteriology, nutritional deficiencies, and human exposure to pesticides and heavy metals.
  • Training - at the national, regional, and international levels.

In Cameroon, there is a lack of data about neonatal infections and the infant mortality rate is very high (60.91 deaths/1,000 live births). Some data from the CPC indicate the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria to commonly used antibiotics in enteric bacteria (45% for Salmonella and 95% for Shigella) and an increase of resistance to fluoroquinolons in urinary bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsielle pneumoniae).

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Among bacteria causing meningitis, drug resistance is also observed; an average of 20% of Streptococcus pneumoniae show a decreased susceptibility to penicillins.

During the pilot phase, the CPC will help construct a large cohort of newborns in the urban area of Yaounde. This cohort will consist of 500 neonates who will be carefully followed for the first 6 months of life. As a partner organisation for the BIRDY project, the CPC is also a full Member of its Steering Committee. With its extensive experience managing large, long term cohorts of pregnant women and children, the CPC is an ideal partner for the ChARLI project.

The BIRDY project Team

The BIRDY project Team in Cameroon combines the expertise in antimicrobial resistance of the bacteriology service, directed by MC Fonkoua, with the cohort management capacity of the Public health and Epidemiology service conducted by G. Texier.

The coordinating group at the local level

Dr Gaétan Texier , (MD, MPH) is an epidemiologist and Public Health specialist and head of the Epidemiology and Public Health department at the CPC. He has worked in the field of disease surveillance (weekly and syndromic surveillance, epidemiological investigation, outbreak management, information system, detection algorithm, etc) and infectious disease risk assessment (remote sensing, medical entomology, chemoprophylaxis observance, humanitarian evaluation, etc) in several countries (French Guiana, Republic of Djibouti, Kosovo, Haiti, USA, Senegal, Germany, Ivory Coast, etc).

Dr. Marie-Christine Fonkoua, (HDR) is a microbiologist and head of the bacteriology department at the CPC. Her field of activities concerns the diagnosis of bacterial infections, the biological surveillance of epidemics (cholera, meningitis, etc.), and the surveillance of antibiotic resistanceAntibiotic resistance
Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing steadily worldwide in hospitals as well as in the community. These infections often have more severe outcomes than those caused by so called "sensitive" bacteria. As a consequence, they also require more expensive second-line treatments as well as a more careful and costly follow-up care for patients.
. She had already contributed to several research studies carried-out within the Institut Pasteur International Network. Deeply involved in training activities, she is the coordinator of the Global Food Infections Network (GFN) for French-speaking African countries. She has extensive experience in training microbiologists on the following topics: bacterial identifications, antibiotic resistanceAntibiotic resistance
Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing steadily worldwide in hospitals as well as in the community. These infections often have more severe outcomes than those caused by so called "sensitive" bacteria. As a consequence, they also require more expensive second-line treatments as well as a more careful and costly follow-up care for patients.
surveillance, and creation of network laboratories with the development of standardized procedures.

OPERATING PARTNERS


FOCUS ON CAMEROON

(data extracted from the CIA world-fact book)

Population: 19,711,291 (July 2011 est.)
Age repartition
- 0-14 years: 40.5% (male 4,027,381/female 3,956,219)
- 15-64 years: 56.2% (male 5,564,570/female 5,505,857)
- 65 years and over: 3.3% (male 300,929/female 356,335) (2011 est.)

Urban population: 58% of total population (2010)

Life expectancy:: 54.39 years/ World ranking: 201
/ World ranking: 24

Infant mortality rate: total: 60.91 deaths/1,000 live births. World ranking: 32 (2011 est.)

Major infectious diseases:
with a degree of risk very high
Food or waterborne diseases: bacterial and protozoal diarrhea, hepatitis A and E, and typhoid fever
Vector-borne diseases: malaria and yellow fever
Water contact disease: schistosomiasis
Respiratory disease: meningococcal meningitis
Animal contact disease: rabies (2009)

GDP (purchasing power parity):$44.33 billion (2010 est.) World ranking: 95

Population below poverty line:48% (2000 est.)


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