> home | Our Partners | Operating Partners | Institut Pasteur in Dakar

INSTITUT PASTEUR IN DAKAR

The Institut Pasteur in Dakar created in 1923 is, following a signed agreement between the government of the republic of Senegal and the Institut Pasteur on September 29th, 2009, a private non-profit Senegalese foundation and has been recognized in 2010 by the national government as an organisation "d'utilité publique" (beneficial to the public at large).


The Institut contributes to public health in Senegal and beyond by implementing research activities, teaching, training, providing medical, epidemiological, and biological expertise, as well as in the production of yellow fever vaccine. 

The missions of the Institut Pasteur in Dakar include: 


  • Research activities - including research on arboviruses and hemorrhagic fever viruses, malaria, and bacterial ecology and antibiotic resistanceAntibiotic resistance
    Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing steadily worldwide in hospitals as well as in the community. These infections often have more severe outcomes than those caused by so called "sensitive" bacteria. As a consequence, they also require more expensive second-line treatments as well as a more careful and costly follow-up care for patients.
    .


  • Public health activities - as a WHO collaborating center for arboviruses and viral hemorrhagic fevers and WHO national laboratory for flu, measles, and poliomyelitis.  The institut serves as an international vaccination center including rabies prevention and treatment. The Institue is also the national reference center for rabies.

  • Training and education activities - The Institut Pasteur in Dakar provides internships and training for students, technicians, biologists, and doctoral students as well as international courses in subjects such as arbovirology, rabies, and biostatistics.


  • Vaccine production - production of the vaccine against yellow fever is assured by the institut Pasteur in Dakar.

Currently, the epidemiology of infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria in Senegal is not well known as local laboratories lack the resources necessary to identify pathogens and their resistance profiles.  However, studies have reported elevated percentages of ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae among neonatal infections as well as in the community.



For the BIRDY project purpose, the Institut Pasteur in Dakar will set up two neonatal cohorts; one in the suburb of Dakar, Guédiawaye and one in the rural town of Khombole. Pregnant mothers will be recruited in order to include 300 newborns into the cohort from each study site.  These newborns will be followed during their first year of life to investigate episodes of bacterial infections.

The BIRDY project, funded by the Total Foundation, has been running since February 2014 in Senegal and will work alongside pre-existing community networks of women trained to identify and counsel pregnant women living in their neighborhoods. 

With experience in numerous infectious disease studies, the Institut Pasteur in Dakar and the BIRDY study staff is highly experienced in implementing and following large cohorts.




The BIRDY project Team

The project team will unite staff from the Epidemiology unit, the Clinical Biology Center, and the Experimental Bacteriology Laboratory which are involved in microbiological diagnosis and public health surveys.

The coordinating group at the local level

Dr Muriel VRAY, researcher in epidemiology at INSERM, Muriel Vray (MV) is specialized in clinical researchand in pharmaco-epidemiology. She is involved in the methodology of pragmatictrials and in studies of treatment strategy. She has collaborated in nationaland international recommendations on the methodology of equivalence ornon-inferiority trials. Based at Institut Pasteur de Dakar since 2015, MV headsthe unit of epidemiology of the infectious diseases. Expert in severalcommittees: AFSSAPS, l’ANRS and INSERM. MV supervised the methodology of several multicentric clinicaltrials in AIDS, viral hepatitis, malaria, malnutrition in France, Africa andAsia and she conducted several epidemiological studies in metabolic aspects ofchronic diseases.


Awa NDIR,  Public health expert, pursuing a PhD in public health at Pierre and Marie Curie University. Awa has been involved in numerous epidemiological and pharmaco-economic studies and has mostly recently been working in the infection prevention and control program for the Senegalese Ministry of Health. 




Prof Amy GASSAMA SOW, Microbiologist, Ph.D

Head of the Unit of Experimental Bacteriology and the Laboratory of Food Safety and Environmental Health at the Institut Pasteur in Dakar. 

Her activities are focused on the aetiologies and pathogenesis of bacterial gastroenteritis, laboratory evaluation of bacterial diarrhea, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistanceAntibiotic resistance
Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing steadily worldwide in hospitals as well as in the community. These infections often have more severe outcomes than those caused by so called "sensitive" bacteria. As a consequence, they also require more expensive second-line treatments as well as a more careful and costly follow-up care for patients.
, and molecular mechanisms of tramission of resistance genes.



Dr. Abdoulaye SECK, Microbiologist, PharmD, deputy head of the laboratory of medical biology at the Institut Pasteur in Dakar, and Assistant Professor in bacteriology and virology, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacy, and Dentistry of Dakar.  His research activities focus on the aetiologies of bacteria responsible for diarrhea and respiratory infections, susceptibility testing and mechanisms of antibiotic resistanceAntibiotic resistance
Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing steadily worldwide in hospitals as well as in the community. These infections often have more severe outcomes than those caused by so called "sensitive" bacteria. As a consequence, they also require more expensive second-line treatments as well as a more careful and costly follow-up care for patients.
, and Helicobacter pylori infections and hepatitis viruses. 























OPERATING PARTNERS


FOCUS ON SENEGAL

(data extracted from the CIA world-fact book)

Population:
13,635,927 (July 2014 est.)
Urban population:
42.5% of total population (2011)
Birth rate:
35.09 births/1,000 population/ World ranking: 25

Infant mortality rate:
total: 52.72 deaths/1,000 live births
country / World ranking: 35

Major infectious diseases:
degree of risk:very high
food or waterborne diseases:bacterial and protozoal diarrhea, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever
vectorborne diseases:dengue fever, malaria, and yellow fever
water contact disease:schistosomiasis
respiratory disease:meningococcal meningitis
animal contact disease:rabies (2013)
Economy: country comparison by GDP: ranks 120


WEBSITE